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Continuing Education at PAFA



Art History

Painting: Impressionism to Modernism (ONLINE)

$275

with Kate Samworth

Calendar Current session started Jan 22, 2021 at 1 pm, runs for 8 weeks

Be inspired to experiment with the ideas and techniques of the Modern Masters in this art appreciation/hands-on studio course. Zoom lectures and discussions will examine the historical context, techniques, aesthetics, and emotional content of several art movements in Europe and America from the 1880s to the 1950s, including Impressionism, Cubism, Dada and Surrealism, the Ballet Russe, art of the Harlem Renaissance and the WPA, and Modernism. Out-of-class assignments will build off the lectures, allowing students to experiment in the style of the movements in the drawing, painting, or collage media of their choice.

Zoom meetings will focus on art historical discussion and critiques of students’ assignments, but will not offer how-to drawing/painting instruction. Prior drawing/painting experience is recommended, but experimentation is welcome.

Registration Still Available

Materials List: Samworth Art Appreciation in Practice Impressionism to Modernism

CE Policy Guide Spring 2021

Zoom Technical Requirements

Pre-College: The Art of Magic and Myths: Ancient Worlds

$50

with Susannah Fishman

Calendar Next available session starts Feb 9, 2021 at 4 pm, runs for 5 weeks

Art is central to what makes humans unique as a species, and it has played an essential role in societies from the earliest homo sapiens to the present. But art was not always confined to a museum or a picture frame. Before art, science, and politics were considered separate spheres, art was used to cast spells, create sacred spaces, protect families, terrify opponents, and heal the sick. 

This class will explore how art objects were used and understood in ancient societies from cave paintings created over 20,000 years ago in Europe to images of magical creatures from 2,600 years ago in the Middle East. Why did societies create magical objects of art, and how were societies shaped by their creation? We will take the magic imbued in these objects seriously, as their creators surely did.

This class will include lecture, discussion, and student presentations on Zoom, as well as short reading and writing assignments on Canvas. Students will have the choice of doing a written or visual final project. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Students will learn how to analyze objects in their social context
  • Students will gain a deeper knowledge of the history of ancient art
  • Students will learn how categories of knowledge such as art and science have shifted over time
  • Student will learn to read and analyze academic writing
  • Students will learn to articulate their ideas verbally and in writing

Susannah Fishman earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology/Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania, and has worked on excavations in Jordan, Azerbaijan, and the United States. Since then, she has worked with teens in online and museum public education. 

Students have the option of taking this class for 0.5 college credit or no credit. The only difference in experience is that "for-credit" students will receive a grade for their work. Students may combine this with The Art of Magic and Myths: American Culture for 1.0 college credit.

International students are welcome! However, the registration process is different to support international payment systems. Please reach out to precollege@pafa.org to register as an international student.

Art & Literacy in the 18th & 19th Centuries (ONLINE) IN 651AG_ON

$195

with Dr. Paul Sivitz

Calendar Next available session starts Mar 9, 2021 at 7:30 pm, runs for 4 weeks

The Gentleman’s Magazine served as the primary source for knowledge and learning during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Long articles in extremely small type covered subjects as diverse as science, architecture, antiquities, and history. Stock prices, British and foreign news, and life-cycle announcements were regular features. The illustrations (usually in the form of engravings) enabled those with poor reading skills to engage with the textual content. This course examines the intersection of art and literacy in eighteenth-century Britain and beyond.

Note: No class on March 30

Register by: February 26

CE Policy Guide Spring 2021

Zoom Technical Requirements

Image:

The Young Traders or “The Young Merchants,” 1844, Joseph Ives Pease after William Page, (1809-1883)/(1811-1885), Etching, engraving and stipple on cream wove paper,3 5/8 x 3 1/4 in. (9.2075 x 8.255 cm.), collection of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, accession # 1876.9.431a, John S. Phillips Collection

Thomas Eakins' "Clinic" Paintings (ONLINE) IN 651EC_ON

$195

with Dr. Paul Sivitz

Calendar Next available session starts Mar 10, 2021 at 7:30 pm, runs for 4 weeks

Thomas Eakins’ two medical masterpieces, The Gross Clinic and The Agnew Clinic were both displayed at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. This course examines Eakins’ “modernized” use of a long-standing genre that made The Gross Clinic appear so off-putting to viewers in its initial reception. Discussion will also consider whether Eakins’ participation in the Chicago World’s Fair contributed to the racial inequality promoted by the fair’s organizers.

Note: No class on March 31

Register by:  February 26

CE Policy Guide Spring 2021

Zoom Technical Requirements

Image:

Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), Portrait of Dr. Samuel D. Gross (The Gross Clinic), 1875, oil on canvas, 96 x 78 1/2 in. Collection of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and Philadelphia Museum of Art, accession #2007.2, Gift of the Alumni Association to Jefferson Medical College in 1878 and purchased by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2007 with the generous support of more than 3,400 donors.

Pre-College: The Art of Magic and Myths: American Culture

$50

with Kristina Murray

Calendar Next available session starts Mar 16, 2021 at 4 pm, runs for 5 weeks

Storytelling in all its forms has played a critical role in constructing our collective understanding of the United States of America. From grand history paintings to Broadway musicals, Americans have used various forms of art to share our struggles, celebrate our triumphs and articulate what unites us as citizens. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, both as an academy and museum, has always contributed to this American narrative.

This class will explore how America has relied on the art of myth making throughout its history. Whether creating a national identity or sustaining cultural and political norms, mythmaking has always been an important part of our legacy. Why do democratic nations rely on the art of visual storytelling, and how does this affect and influence national culture, morals and politics?

This class will include lecture, discussion, and student presentations on Zoom, as well as short reading and writing assignments on Canvas. Students will have the choice of doing a written or visual final project. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Students will learn how to analyze works in their social context
  • Students will gain a deeper knowledge of mythbuilding in American visual culture
  • Students will examine a variety of American art forms from throughout its history
  • Student will learn to read and analyze academic writing
  • Students will learn to articulate their ideas verbally and in writing

Kristina Murray earned her M.A in Art History from Temple after working for several years as a high school English teacher. She is PAFA's Teen Programs Coordinator with a passion for developing and leading social-justice oriented, skill-based leadership curriculum and programming. 

Students have the option of taking this class for 0.5 college credit or no credit. The only difference in experience is that "for-credit" students will receive a grade for their work. Students may combine this with The Art of Magic and Myths: Ancient Worlds for 1.0 college credit.

International students are welcome! However, the registration process is different to support international payment systems. Please reach out to precollege@pafa.org to register as an international student.

More History of the Printed Image (ONLINE) PR 650EH_ON

$75

with Tony Rosati

Calendar Next available session starts Mar 19, 2021 at 1 pm, runs for 3 weeks

Join Tony Rosati, Chair of the PAFA Printmaking Department, for another fascinating exploration of the important prints and books spanning the 15th to 21st centuries. This session’s selected topics will include William Blake’s illuminated books, influences, and printing processes; screenprinting’s history, milestone prints, and evolution from silkscreen; and the significance of select artists, writers, and publishers in the context of 20th century printmaking.

Register by:  January 29

CE Policy Guide Spring 2021

Zoom Technical Requirements





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